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Scholar refutes Dalai's claim of "cultural genocide"

(2009/05/22)

    "Dalai just played the same old tune in alleging that the Chinese government has conducted a cultural genocide in Tibet," said Hu Yan, director of the Research Department of Ethnic and Religious Theory in the Party School of the Central Committee of CPC.

    In a CNN interview broadcast, the Dalai Lama claimed that the vast majority of Tibetans were "very unhappy" as they saw their "Tibetan cultural heritage "passing through something like a death sentence" and Tibet's prospects appear "hopeless" as the Chinese government seeks to flood this region with ethnic Han settlers and dilute its Buddhist culture.

    "It has been Dalai's tactic in recent years to attempt to draw close attention to Tibet's culture," Hu noted.

    Hu said that any westerner without a bias who has ever been to Tibet may check the reality there.

    Even in the cities or prefectures with thriving tourism such as Lhasa and Xigaze, the local Tibetans still communicate in their own language.

    They share a traditional lifestyle: rolling prayer wheels and doing business. Pilgrims from afar still worship in their own religious way.

    With governments' financing, many famous monasteries in Tibet and other Tibetan-inhabited areas have been renovated and well persevered. Some of them are much more magnificent and splendid than government office buildings and public schools.

    Hu pointed out that the Chinese government has never pursued the policy of a large-scale human migration to Tibet and other Tibetan-inhabited areas or the policy of "diluting Tibet culture, as claimed by the Dalai Lama and his followers.

    Protection, prosperity and development of the Tibetan ethnic culture are definitely better than any other period in Tibet's history. "Since the Dalai Lama always ignores the facts and slanders the Chinese government with trumped-up charges, how can he win the respect of those respecting facts?" Professor Hu questioned.



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